Lesson: What’s Your Name? Speech and Body Percussion Piece

…When the beat has been established, bring the other group in chanting the speech piece. 4. Switch groups. Repeat. 5. Challenge!! Have the entire class perform the speech and body percussion together. B SECTION After students have successfully learned the speech and body percussion of the A section introduce the B section . In the B section students will take turns saying their first name in rhythm. Example: My name is Franklin. (See rhythm exampl…

Good, Better, Best

…at demonstrate positive characteristics. After imitating each word through rhythmic speech, students combine them in pairs at first and then improvising word chains of four to create an 8-beat phrase. One word should be repeated in each word chain, but two may be repeated for forms like aabb or abab. Avoid through-composed chains (no abcd). Students organize into three groups, and each group composes an 8-beat word chain that illustrates an elemen…

Making It Work: Orff Level I

…include reading articles, journaling, and written assignments such as the rhythmic notation of speech and the arranging of melodies in the style. The instructor will model all of the assignments carefully and usually give you a chance to rework assignments if you didn’t get it quite right the first time. The goal is for you to understand the concepts and be successful. Photo Credit: Indiana University – Purdue University Fort Wayne   Some prepara…

Composition and Improvisation: Oliver Twist

…ties at the barred instruments – It should be noted that while writing the rhythmic compositions works well in pairs, I have found this activity to be easier as a solo project. Once the students are comfortable with their rhythmic compositions, they sit with a barred instrument. In my classroom, I have found it helpful to scatter the students around the room with an instrument so that they can hear themselves better. Before improvising at the inst…

Lesson: Henry the Hungry Hound

…ich I had purchased on TPT. Each sound bank card was displayed next to the rhythmic pattern. (See above chart) We then recorded the “Let’s Be Kind” Song and chanted their rhythmic kindness creations at the end of the song. A recording was sent to each teacher to be used in the classroom as a kindness anthem for the class. Henry the Hungry Hound Sound Story Materials Materials that we used to create the sound story were pitched and unpitched percus…

Rhythm Cards, Manipulatives for notation

…rest Three beamed eighths If you want a simple way for students to notate rhythmic speech, put rhymes on adding machine tape. Lay out the rhythm first and write the text under to get the spacing correct, then laminate the long strips. Remind the students to place the rhythm cards over the text. Third level- rhythms to be completed Following the examples found in Music for Children, Vol. 1, pp. 64-66 have the students listen to the first half of a…

Nature’s Second Instrument: Rhythm

…lines. Use the augmentation example as the foundation. Layer the original rhythmic example on top. Note that you will have to repeat the original example in order to accommodate the length of the augmented example. The example in diminution will need to be repeated four times: Consider having students perform their compositions using body percussion, speech, small percussion, pentatonic melody, and movement – the possibilities are plentiful to ha…

Venturing into Vocal Improvisation

…king on. Use bee building blocks to create a B section, performed first as speech to model a specific form (i.e. aaab: Hornet, Hornet, Hornet, Honeybee) Try some examples as a group, then have students create their own pattern to match your desired form. Sing entire B section (the created rhythmic building block sentence) on sol, then all on mi. Improvise vocally moving between sol and mi as individuals choose. (Everyone is improvising at the same…

Lesson: Rain of Leaves

…for them. Teacher leads rhythmic LSAs in the same meter of the song using rhythmic solfege (du-de system preferred). Rhythmic LSAs should begin with call and response of the same patterns, and then move to Call and response where the students change what the teacher calls. This way the students are already audiating and creating new rhythms to use later. 4. Sing the song again asking them to listen for any of the words from their list that appear…

Purposeful Pathways Lesson: Never Sleep Late Anymore

…ut the entire song on the solfa tone ladder. Students sing the melody from rhythmic notation with solfa Students sing the melody, with solfa and hand signs, reading from the staff. Students sing the melody with text. PATHWAY TO Partwork: Rhythmic Ostinato Perform the BP ostinato. Ask the students to join you when they are ready. (simultaneous imitation) Students sing the song, while patting and clapping the rhythmic ostinato. Establish the ostinat…